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Source: University of Otago

University of Otago Director of International Jason Cushen presents the Internationalisation Framework on 9 June.
The launch of the University of Otago’s Internationalisation Framework confirms its ongoing commitment to global engagement and partnership.

“Now is not the time to withdraw within national boundaries. Te Aka Whakaranea ā-Ao is the University’s commitment to internationalisation.”

The Te Aka Whakaranea ā-Ao had its soft launch during a visit from a group of ambassadors based in New Zealand and Australia to the University’s Dunedin campus on 9 June.
Te Aka Whakaranea ā-Ao (The Abundant Global Vine) which represents the cultural and educational value of international engagement.
The Framework will set the tone and direction of how Otago will engage globally, providing critical context for investment and decision-making across the University. It is structured into three pillars: Otago as a Global Citizen, Internationalsation of the Student Experience and the Recruitment of International Student Talent. Under each pillar there are specific objectives, goals and targets.
In 2019, the Framework was developed following interviews with the Vice-Chancellor’s Advisory Group (VCAG) and other senior staff, as well as a number of divisional forums. In addition, student input and feedback informed the development of this document, facilitated by the OUSA 2019 International Student Representative.
Te Aka Whakaranea ā-Ao was launched in front of ambassadors based in New Zealand and Australia.
However, following the COVID-19 outbreak in China and following worldwide pandemic put the project on hold.
University Director of International Jason Cushen says COVID-19 has had a profound and immediate impact on the international education system, so Te Aka Whakaranea ā-Ao was put on hold in February 2020 and recalibrated for the post-COVID-19 environment.
While Otago is in a better position than most other Universities worldwide, it has not been sheltered from the impact of COVID-19. The University’s international cohort is now reduced to five per cent of the total equivalent full-time students.
The Internationalisation Framework will cover the period between 2021-25, with the intention to rebuild Otago’s international cohort back to 15 per cent in the next five years, Mr Cushen says.
“Now is not the time to withdraw within national boundaries. Te Aka Whakaranea ā-Ao is the University’s commitment to internationalisation.”

MIL OSI