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NZ helping countries prepare for life after covid

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Source: MakeLemonade.nz

Christchurch – New Zealand is helping other countries’ exercise industry organisations and registration bodies to prepare to open fully up exercise facilities, post-covid lockdown or after nations start returning to business as normal, ExerciseNZ chief executive Richard Beddie says.

New Zealand was one of the first countries in the world to re-open significantly after lockdown, so we are in a unique position to share our leanings with others, so they can do it safely and also in a way that supports physical activity levels.

Beddie is part of weekly Zoom sessions with international exercise associations, international gym chains, industry experts and the World Health Organisation, with about 20 to 30 countries taking part.

“We were one of the first nations in the world to open up our gyms and fitness facilities so we have provided other countries a framework or model how they could reopen, when they are ready.

“Our framework is all evidence based, rather than just a list of good ideas.  I have also presented to the international group our re-opening statistics both at alert level two and level one which, overall, show a quick rebound for gyms, yoga studios and recreation facilities.

“Part of the problem earlier on was mixed messages from governments when it came to mask use. However, we stuck with the evidence and advocated for them in settings where physical social distancing couldn’t be maintained for prolonged contact times such as personal training.

“We have been proven correct by recent support from WHO, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and multiple government health departments that now include masks as a part of their covid controls.

“While the risk of community transmission and background virus level varies significantly between countries, the fundamental tools at our disposal don’t change. They include:  physical distancing, contact tracing, engineering controls and PPE.

“We’ve been able to share the framework we developed for New Zealand, and part of it are now mirrored around the globe, which we are very proud of.”

“We are now attempting to engage with the NZ Ministry of Health around what protocols may be required should any further level changes take place – the key is we have time to plan, so have been doing it,” Beddie says.

For further information contact Make Lemonade NZ editor-in-chief Kip Brook on 0275 030188

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