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Source: Eastern Institute of Technology – Tairāwhiti

3 mins ago

Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson (left) addresses a function at Toihoukura School of Māori Visual Arts at EIT’s Tairāwhiti Campus. Also in attendance was Tairāwhiti Campus Manager Waata Shepherd (second left) and EIT Chief Executive Chris Collins (right).

Toihoukura, EIT’s School of Māori Visual Arts in Tairāwhiti, was the appropriate location this week for three Government Ministers to unveil investments into arts and culture with a focus on mātauranga Māori.

The delegation of Ministers was led by the Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson, who made the announcement on behalf of the Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage and MP for East Coast, Kiritapu Allan, who was isolating. The other Ministers in attendance were Māori Crown Relations: Te Arawhiti – Minister Kelvin Davis; and the MP for Ikaroa-Rāwhiti, Meka Whaitiri, who is the Minister for Customs.

Tama Waipara, Minister Jackson, EIT Toihoukura lecturers Erana Koopu and Ngaire Tuhua at a function at Toihoukura School of Māori Visual Arts at EIT’s Tairāwhiti Campus.

The welcome for the Ministers, was led by EIT kaumatua Taina Ngarimu, with Toihoukura staff and students,  EIT Chief Executive Chris Collins and EIT Tairāwhiti Campus Manager, Waata Shepherd, in attendance.

About 25 students showed the guests their work on display at Toihoukura, during the visit on Tuesday.

Mr Collins welcomed the Ministers and said it was significant that the announcement was made at Toihoukura.

“EIT is proud that through Toihoukura we are able to give Tairāwhiti artists the opportunity to reach their potential and fulfil their ambitions. This region is rich in Māori culture and heritage, and we are pleased to be able to support and promote this through Toihoukura, the Tairāwhiti Campus and the wider EIT.

Mr Shepherd says: “Toihoukura, its history and place in Toi Māori is not only recognised in Tairāwhiti but also across New Zealand. The funding announced by the Government will support what is being achieved at Toihoukura and the wider benefits that Toi Māori brings to our communities.”

Minister Jackson highlighted how significant Toihoukura had been in fostering and growing more than three generations of Māori artists, and that this was one reason the announcement was made there.

Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson (left) addresses a function at Toihoukura School of Māori Visual Arts at EIT’s Tairāwhiti Campus. Looking on is Tairāwhiti Campus Manager Waata Shepherd.

In a statement on behalf of Minister Allan, Minister Jackson said government investment into culture and heritage will ensure the sector continues to flourish with a focus on resilience, sustainability, and mātauranga Māori.

“A focus of this budget is supporting iwi Māori to elevate and enrich the culture and heritage of tangata whenua, recognising their role as knowledge holders, cultural owners and kaitiaki of mātauranga Māori.”

“This includes a $4 million boost to funding for Te Matatini to help the group develop their aspirations above and beyond the Herenga Waka Herenga Tangata Festival and continue to inspire generations.”

COVID-19 protocols were strictly adhered to, in particular restricting numbers attending the event, hariru and hongi (following whakatau) was replaced with the ‘elbow shake’.

MIL OSI