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Source: Auckland Council

Each area of the Ōrewa coastline faces its own challenges and the council’s response to managing these challenges will be tailored to suit.

As we continue our work to better understand the current and future issues facing this part of the region, our approach to managing these challenges continues to evolve, and there are many decisions yet to be made. As we move forward, we will continue to engage with the local community to find out what they value most, and to share some of the constraints that we are facing. 

In the meantime, here is an overview of where things are at and what some of our next steps are:

Renewal of the northern seawall

Work on the next phase of the Ōrewa seawall project is underway after the resource consent was granted via the Environment Court.

The project is now in the developed design phase, with site surveying and investigation due to begin in May 2022.

Once this phase is complete, the final construction costs will be determined, and the construction programme will be finalised.

Final decisions around the amount and timings of budget allocation will then need to be made by the governing body.

Construction on the seawall is expected to commence in late 2023 at the earliest.

Ōrewa Reserve

Future development options for Ōrewa Reserve are currently being considered, and work is being processed to determine the most suitable long-term approaches in respect of the projected climate change impacts.

This includes options for the redevelopment of the Ōrewa foreshore with reference to the Ōrewa Beach Esplanade Enhancement Project, and the proposed relocation of the Ōrewa Surf Lifesaving Club building.

Our approach will respond to community needs and service requirements, identified parks outcomes, forecast population growth, and predicted sea-level rise and climate change.

Feedback that we have received from the community and surf club has confirmed how important maintaining a quality beach experience is. Further engagement with the community will be undertaken once a range of feasible options have been determined.

Targeted sand transfer

The impact of storm events on Ōrewa beach is regularly monitored, with the post-storm impacts of erosion continuing to be managed via sand replenishment, which is a permitted activity under the resource consent.

This management response has been successfully undertaken for the past 20 years and at this time, remains the most cost-effective way to maintain a dry high tide beach, with the related benefits of improved amenity and pedestrian access.

These outcomes are core to the experience that makes Ōrewa beach so valued by the community.

MIL OSI