Post sponsored by NewzEngine.com

Source: New Zealand Ministry of Health

This publication provides an evidence-based literature review on best practices pertaining to models of care in the four areas, which broadly represent the main sectors of Forensic Mental Health Service delivery (inpatient, community, prisons, and courts).

The researchers additionally conducted a review of regional, national, and international grey literature to examine further models of care as articulated in organisational documentation

He Ara Oranga provides us with a blueprint to develop future service delivery. We are challenged to develop models of care which are co-produced, recovery-oriented, evidence-based and which place Tangata Whaiora and their whānau at the centre of all that we do. Our shared goal is to make our Forensic Mental Health Services (FMHS) centres of excellence that are trauma informed, and culturally responsive in addressing mental health and offending needs.

The number of tāngata whaiora requiring access for treatment in FMHS has significantly increased over time however, the size of our services have not. We recognise now is the time to reflect and review all aspects of FMHS, in order to plan for future developments that better place Tangata Whaiora and their whānau at the centre.

FMHS very often provides support and services for tāngata whaiora who are especially vulnerable, including those with very high and complex social needs, and those with multiple mental health and addiction needs. Tangata Whaiora who are Māori are alarmingly overrepresented, and the number of women accessing services is also on the rise. In addition, there has been a reduction in the prison population, and the increased demand for mental health and addiction services among this population results in even more pressure for our FMHS.

The document provides a literature review of the evidence based best practices pertaining to models of care in the four areas, which broadly represent the main sectors of Forensic Mental Health Service delivery (inpatient, community, prisons, and courts). 

The researchers additionally conducted a review of regional, national, and international grey literature to examine further models of care as articulated in organisational documentation

This literature review will support ongoing work in the Forensic services in New Zealand to support Tangata Whaiora on their journey to achieve a greater wellbeing.

MIL OSI