Post sponsored by NewzEngine.com

Source: Tertiary Education Commission

Last updated 24 September 2021
Last updated 24 September 2021

On Wednesday 8 September, the government announced a $20 million boost to the Hardship Fund for Learners (HAFL), to be paid out to providers.
On Wednesday 8 September, the government announced a $20 million boost to the Hardship Fund for Learners (HAFL), to be paid out to providers.

HAFL supports Tertiary Education Organisations to provide temporary financial assistance for currently enrolled students who are facing hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Hardship can mean any suffering, deprivation or financial challenge faced by a learner due to the COVID-19 pandemic that is interfering with their ability to progress with their study
One of New Zealand’s largest tertiary education providers, with more than 80 locations across New Zealand, Te Wānanga o Aotearoa has shared the impact and difference the HAFL fund is making to their tauira (students).
The tauira demographic at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is vulnerable to lockdown implications and many have competing demands during these uncertain times. Te Wānanga o Aotearoa realised the impacts they had seen in the first lockdown would be repeated in subsequent lockdowns unless significant precautionary measures were taken.
Following the initial HAFL funding, analysis showed that Te Wānanga o Aotearoa tauira who accessed support and subsequently received a device to help with their studies were able to complete their course at the same rates as the average completion rate.
Nepia Winiata Acting Te Taiurungi (Acting CEO) Te Wānanga o Aotearoa tauira says the HAFL funding is an important tool in supporting tauira to continue their studies under COVID-19 restrictions.
“The funding is a pure enablement opportunity, allowing those that cannot study to participate and complete as normal,” he says.
Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is focusing their HAFL funding on higher-risk tauira as hardship remains an ongoing issue for many of them. Results so far have shown that when tauira receive a HAFL grant, they complete their courses at 9% above average completion rates.
Te Wānanga o Aotearoa now has the capacity to track interventions and investments versus outcomes, which enables them to continue supporting tauira who need it most.
Following the latest government announcement, TEC has already allocated half of this new funding out to providers and is working with the sector on ensuring it is easily accessible to all learners who require additional support.  

MIL OSI