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Source: Auckland Council

New roles are coming for Manurewa Local Board members.

Until now, elected members have had responsibility for ‘portfolios’ such as parks or business, allowing them to focus on work programmes and community needs while allowing others to use their time on other board matters.

But board chair Joseph Allan says members have voted to align responsibilities with the outcomes listed in the 2020 Manurewa Local Board plan.

With oversight of all outcomes, he says the change will remain in place until the end of the elected term.

“Auckland Council restructuring and adopting our local board plan have given us an opportunity to review the way we do things.

“We believe it will bring a broader range of views and expertise to issues because members will be dealing with overlapping areas instead of the more limited portfolio topics.”

The 2020 board plan lists six outcomes:

  • Our communities are inclusive, vibrant, healthy and connected
  • We are proud of our strong Māori identity and thriving Māori community
  • Our people enjoy a choice of quality community spaces and use them often
  • Our safe and accessible network provides transport options to meet community needs 
  • Our prosperous local economy supports local people
  • Our natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced.

Anne Candy will be responsible for inclusive communities, with all members contributing to the Māori identity and community strand alongside Tira Kapuia, a board-led group that champions Māori aspirations, to give the outcome more focus.

Glenn Murphy and Dave Pizzini combine to lead the community spaces outcome, Ken Penney takes the transport line, Melissa Moore the economy, and Tabetha Gorrie and Rangi McLean partner under the natural environment outcome.

Deputy chair Moore says the change will allow members to adopt a wider view of their work.

“Having champions for our natural world is good for the environment and jobs can be created too, which is good for our economy, while that healthy natural environment also contributes to providing quality community spaces.”

When the 2016-19 elected period was reviewed, feedback from members identified some negatives around the portfolio system.

Allan says the board is taking a lead in testing a new way of doing things.

“They say if you do the same thing, you get the same result. We are keen to see if we can do things a little differently, in a way we believe will help us deliver better results for the people of our area.”

MIL OSI