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Source: Human Rights Commission

The Human Rights Commission will embark on a ground-breaking inquiry into the persistent Pacific pay gap and lack of equal employment opportunities experienced by Pacific peoples. 

Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner Saunoamaali’i Karanina Sumeo made the announcement while launching the report “Talanoa: Human rights issues for Pacific peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand. 

“Through the Talanoa report, we heard directly from our Pacific communities about the human rights violations they are experiencing. Pay and racial discrimination continues to rank high,” says Saunoamaali’i Karanina Sumeo. 

“In addition to low wages, Pacific workers say they are often overlooked for upskilling opportunities and promotions. These workers also fear retaliation in raising concerns with their employers. This is racist and discriminatory.” 

“If we don’t act now, we continue to fail every Pacific child, adult, and household denying their right to live with dignity.”

Labour force data indicate that Pacific workers are the lowest paid across the country. The pay gap between Pākehā men and Pacific women in the public sector is a staggering 27 percent. 

Under the inquiry, the Commission will examine the causes and contributory factors of the pay gap, conditions of work, promotion, and career advancement of Pacific workers. 

“At the current rate of progress, it will take Pacific women 120 years to reach pay equity with Pākehā men.” 

“Currently, we don’t even know what the pay gap for Pacific workers is in the private sector because there simply isn’t any reliable data. However, I can’t imagine it being any better than the embarrassingly huge gap in the public sector,” said Sumeo. 

Through the inquiry, the Commission will make recommendations relating to legislation, regulations, policies, practices, procedures, and funding arrangements to reduce the pay gap, and suggest measures to alleviate human rights violations.   

“The marginalisation of Pacific workers has been persistent and chronic for many years. The inequities continue to widen against a backdrop and history of racial discrimination against Pacific peoples. We cannot continue to tolerate this level of inequity. It must end with us.” 

“The government and employers must realise this is a human rights issue. It impacts upon Pacific peoples’ ability to realise the right to equal employment opportunities, the right to be free from discrimination including their right to an adequate standard of living, housing, food, education, and health care,” said Sumeo. 

As a precursor to the pay gap inquiry, the Talanoa report’s overarching recommendation is that the government and private sector engage Pacific communities in dialogue that places their concerns at the heart of activities to address human rights issues. 

“A framework for human rights must be established in talanoa with Pacific communities and should be applied to areas of policy, regulation, and practice that currently cause human rights issues for Pacific peoples. This is how we ensure the realisation of human rights for Pacific communities,” said Sumeo.

Click here to read the report.

Click here to read a summary version (English) of the report.

Click here to read a summary version (Fiji) of the report.

Click here to read a summary version (Niue) of the report.

Click here to read a summary version (Samoa) of the report.

Click here to read a summary version (Tonga) of the report.

Click here to read a summary version (Tuvalu) version of the report.

Click here to read a summary version (Cook Islands) version of the report.

About the report 

A first of its kind, Talanoa: Human rights issues for Pacific peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand was born from kōrero which took place at five fono held across the country in 2018 and 2019. 

It is the first time the Commission has explored the relationship between Pacific peoples and human rights, as defined in domestic and international laws and policies. 

Talanoa covers a range of contemporary and historic issues currently impacting the Pacific diaspora – issues of systemic discrimination, culture and resilience, values, and economic contributions. 

The Human Rights Commission hopes this report will be a basis for discussion and collaboration between government agencies and non-government organisations with Pacific peoples to advance their human rights.  

About the pay gap inquiry 

The Human Rights Commission will inquire into the nature and extent of discrimination experienced by Pacific workers regarding employment in the manufacturing and retail, trade and accommodation sectors across the country. 

Other aspects of the inquiry will focus on equal pay, pay parity, and pay equity issues, working conditions, recruitment, and retention of Pacific workers as they impact equal employment opportunities.  

The Commission hopes to make recommendations on changes to legislation, regulations, policies, practices, procedures, and funding arrangements in the public and private sectors to ensure the reduction of pay gaps are progressed in New Zealand. 

It will be conducted over 12 months and is expected to begin in early 2021. 

MIL OSI