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Source: MIL-OSI Submissions
Source: Social Credit Party leader Chris Leitch

Social Credit is calling for a complete revamp of the electoral system.

The release of the proposed new electoral boundaries is an appropriate time to consider whether our electoral system is fit for purpose or needs a complete revamp.

MMP is not a system designed to provide voters with power in a democracy but one that is designed to provide party hierarchies with list MPs to use as cannon fodder to support their own pet positions on numerous issues.

When the public revolted in 1981 over the inequity of Social Credit gaining 21% of the nationwide vote but only two MPs, and demanded that the first-past-the-post electoral system be done away with, the Siamese twins of National and Labour and their establishment backers promoted MMP because it was the proportional system that still retained the most power for their party hierarchies.

List MPs have to be ‘yes’ men and women in order to get the backing of their party hierarchy to get high enough places on the list and be in with a chance of becoming an MP.

Once in parliament that ‘yes sir’ ‘no sir’ behaviour continues so that they can be sure of retaining their list place and getting back in at the next election.

They don’t need to represent the views of voters because they don’t have an electorate that they are required to front up to at subsequent elections.

Any thought of questioning their party’s position, having dissenting views, or crossing the house to vote with other parties on matters of principle is immediately ruled out.

Our democracy suffers as a result.

In its extensive submissions to the Royal Commission at the time, Social Credit promoted the Single Transferable Vote system of proportional representation which is designed to confer maximum power on voters, reduce the power of party bosses, and, unlike MMP, ensure that every vote counts towards the election of an MP.

Every MP would be directly elected by the public, whereas under MMP, nearly half our MPs are foisted on the public and vote in parliament on matters of critical importance without the public having any influence on the matter.

Under an STV system, electorates would be larger but have more than one MP elected from each one, providing a better choice for voters, and a greater chance of independent MPs gaining a seat.

STV is already used to vote for eleven local authorities.

MIL OSI