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Source: Pharmac

What we’re proposing

We are seeking feedback on a proposal to increase the subsidy payable for two currently funded treatments through a provisional agreement with Radiant Health Limited.

In summary, this proposal would result in the following changes from 1 December 2019:

Consultation closes at 5 pm on Friday, 25 October 2019 and feedback can be emailed to consult@pharmac.govt.nz

To provide feedback

Send us an email: consult@pharmac.govt.nz by 5pm, 25 October 2019.

All feedback received before the closing date will be considered by PHARMAC’s Board (or its delegate) prior to making a decision on this proposal.

Feedback we receive is subject to the Official Information Act 1982 (OIA). Anyone providing feedback, whether on their own account or on behalf of an organisation, and whether in a personal or professional capacity, should be aware that the content of their feedback and their identity may need to be disclosed in response to an OIA request.

We are not able to treat any part of your feedback as confidential unless you specifically request that we do, and then only to the extent permissible under the OIA and other relevant laws and requirements. If you would like us to withhold any commercially sensitive, confidential proprietary, or personal information included in your submission, please clearly state this in your submission and identify the relevant sections of your submission that you would like it withheld. PHARMAC will give due consideration to any such request.

Hexamine hippurate (Hiprex) tablets


What would the effect be?

Hexamine hippurate tablets would be fully funded, which means that there would no longer be a part charge for this medicine. People prescribed this medicine would just need to pay their usual prescription co-payment (usually $5 per prescription item). Currently hexamine hippurate is only partially subsidised, which means that people prescribed this medicine must pay for some of the cost of the medicine.

We think that this will result in more people being able to access this medicine, which is used in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections and could avoid the use of some antibiotics.

Who we think will be interested

  • People who have recurrent urinary tract infections and their whānau
  • Community and hospital pharmacists
  • Primary care prescribers
  • General physicians, physicians for the elderly, infectious diseases physicians, gynaecologists, urologists
  • Aged care residential facilities
  • Pharmaceutical suppliers

About hexamine hippurate and recurrent urinary tract infections

Hexamine hippurate (also known as methenamine hippurate) works to stop the growth of bacteria in the urinary tract. Hexamine hippurate can be used for long periods of time to prevent recurrent urinary tract infections, because (unlike with long-term use of antibiotics) resistance does not seem to develop.

Urinary tract infections are infections in the kidneys or bladder. These infections may resolve without treatment. However, they can cause pain, vomiting, problems with urinating, blood infections and occasionally kidney damage.

Why we’re proposing this

We received expert clinical advice that indicated that hexamine hippurate tablets have a role in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections and that it is important to fully fund this medicine.

Details about our proposal

Hexamine hippurate would continue to be listed in Section B and in Part II of Section H of the Pharmaceutical Schedule, with a subsidy increase from 1 December 2019 as follows (price is ex-manufacturer, excluding GST):

Chemical

Formulation

Brand

Pack size

Proposed price and subsidy

Hexamine hippurate

Tab 1 g

Hiprex

100

$40.01

The Hiprex brand of hexamine hippurate would have protection from delisting and subsidy reduction until 31 August 2022.


Flecainide acetate (Tambocor) injection

What would the effect be?

Flecainide acetate injection would continue to be fully funded. The price and subsidy would be increased in order to ensure we have an ongoing and reliable supply of this important medicine.

Who we think will be interested

  • People who are being treated with flecainide acetate injection and their whānau
  • Community and hospital pharmacists
  • Cardiologists, intensive care specialists, other clinicians involved in the management of acute heart arrhythmias
  • Pharmaceutical suppliers

About flecainide acetate injection and its uses

Flecainide acetate injection is used in people who have problems with heart rhythm (atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias) that has not been controlled with other medicines. Flecainide acetate injection is also used in the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome, which is a genetic disorder that can cause a disruption in the heart’s normal rhythm. 

Why we’re proposing this

We received expert clinical advice that indicated that flecainide acetate injections play an essential role in the clinical management of people with heart rhythm problems. This proposal would allow supply of this medicine to be maintained.

Details about our proposal

Flecainide acetate injection would continue to be listed in Section B and in Part II of Section H of the Pharmaceutical Schedule, with a price and subsidy increase from 1 December 2019 as follows (price is ex-manufacturer, excluding GST):

Chemical

Formulation

Brand

Pack size

Current price and subsidy

Proposed price and subsidy

Flecainide acetate

Inj 10 mg per ml, 15 ml ampoule

Tambocor

5

$52.45

$100.00

The Tambocor brand of flecainide acetate would have protection from delisting and subsidy reduction until 31 August 2022.
 

Last updated: 16 October 2019

MIL OSI