Post sponsored by NewzEngine.com

Source: New Zealand Transport Agency

The NZ Transport Agency is delighted to confirm that construction of the new bridge to replace the Old Māngere Bridge in Auckland will start this year.

A contract for building the new bridge has been awarded to McConnell Dowell and work will start before Christmas, with construction expected to take about two and a half years. 

“The architecturally designed bridge will cross the Manukau Harbour between Onehunga and Māngere Bridge restoring important community connections and creating a stunning new vision across the Harbour for all Aucklanders to be proud of,” says the NZ Transport Agency’s Senior Manager Project Delivery Andrew Thackwray.  

The Old Māngere Bridge, which is more than a hundred years old, was closed for public safety reasons in November 2018. It will be demolished and removed as the new bridge is constructed. 

“The new bridge which was consented in 2016 represents the Transport Agency’s commitment to creating a safer and more accessible transport network as well as building spaces that are attractive and safe for people to sit, gather and walk and cycle.” 

“As well as being a space for the community to enjoy the Manukau Harbour, the new bridge is an important link to the broader cycle network connecting South Auckland to the rest of Auckland and the wider public transport network.” 

Mr Thackwray says the bridge design incorporates several years of work with partners, stakeholders and the community. 

“The design reflects the ideas and thoughts of iwi, the community and those who will use the bridge for walking, biking, fishing and other community activities.” 

That feedback is reflected in the bridge design with its 8-metre wide deck, which is up to 12-metres wide in some places to allow for fishing bays, bench seating, extensive deck and pier lighting, handrails and other safety features. 

The new Māngere Bridge will have a gently sloping deck and bays up to 12 metres wide to suit pedestrians and cyclists as well as people fishing or just wanting to sit and enjoy the view.

The new bridge will be much higher than the old bridge to improve access to the Manukau Harbour for waka, small boats, kayaks and canoes. The bridge deck will have a gentle slope and the 12-metre wide bays will suit pedestrians and cyclists as well as people fishing or just wanting to sit and enjoy the view. 

Artworks designed by two New Zealand artists will be incorporated into the bridge structure and at the entry and exit points. The artwork will help tell the stories of the area and provide greater context around the guardianship of the harbour.

“We believe the bridge, in its new form, will reflect the community, its culture and heritage. We want people to embrace it and use it for building and supporting strong connections across the Manukau Harbour,” says Mr Thackwray.

MIL OSI