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Source: New Zealand Government – Ministry of Social Development

The first E Tū Whānau poster competition is now open. The competition gives people of all ages and backgrounds the chance to win cash prizes of between $200 and $2,500 by designing a poster expressing three of the values that underpin the E Tū Whānau kaupapa.

Their work will be judged by renowned artist, academic and educator, Kura Te Waru-Rewiri and celebrated urban artists, muralists and community art activists, Janine and Charles Williams.

E Tū Whānau, the Māori kaupapa movement for positive change, want whānau across the motu to unleash their creativity and have a go at designing A3 sized posters on:

·         AROHA – giving with no expectation of return

OR

·         MANA/MANAAKI– building the mana of others through nurturing, growing and challenging

OR

·         WHAKAPAPA– knowing who you are and where you belong.

“Art and design are powerful tools to communicate ideas, convey emotion, and inspire action. E Tū Whānau is all about taking action to create positive change in our whānau and our communities,” says E Tū Whānau Kaiwhakahaere, Ann Dysart.

The competition has two prize categories. The General category is open to anyone and has prizes worth $2,500 for the winners of each value. The Tamariki category is for children aged 12 years old and under, and winners will receive a $200 gift voucher for each value. A cash prize of $1,500 will also be awarded to the entry that gets the most votes overall.

Entrants may use any medium and enter as many times as they like, but each entry must focus on one value only, not a combination.

The competition will run on the E Tū Whānau Facebook page and an online entry form must be completed for each entry. A jpeg of the poster design must also be uploaded with each entry form.

Entries to the online competition opened yesterday (October 1) and close on Sunday October 21.

“This competition is open to everyone and anyone, whether you’re a new artist starting out, someone more experienced, or someone who just loves the E Tū Whānau kauapapa and wants to express their feelings visually. Don’t be shy. Just get in there, give it your best go and have fun,” Ann Dysart says.

MIL OSI